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Tag Archives: healthcare contributions

NJ Supreme Court Won’t Rush To Hear Judge’s Challenge of Pension Overhaul

Posted in Uncategorized
  As reported by nj.com, a Superior Court judge challenging the increased payments judges must make under newly-enacted changes to public worker health and pension benefit plans will not be allowed to have his case directly sent to the New Jersey Supreme Court. In a two-paragraph order issued yesterday, Supreme Court Justice Virginia Long said… Continue Reading

Sweeney, Oliver Meet With Unions To Talk Health Care

Posted in Uncategorized
  As reported by nj.com, Democratic leaders met with union officials and sources say the topic was overhauling health benefits. Senate President Steve Sweeney and Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver met with the heads of the biggest public employee unions: Communications Workers of America, America Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, International Federation of Professional and Technical… Continue Reading

Christie Estimates Changes in Employee Benefits Will Save $870M Per Year

Posted in Uncategorized
  As reported by nj.com, Governor Chris Christie estimates his plan to overhaul the state’s public employee health benefits system will save more than $870 million a year by 2014 by shifting significant percentage of the costs to employees and future retirees, according to the Treasury Department. In the most detailed explanation of the proposal… Continue Reading

Sweeney Plan for Healthcare Reform Gains Little Support Among Democrats

Posted in Uncategorized
  As reported by nj.com, Senate President Stephen Sweeney’s plan to require public workers to kick in more for medical benefits is getting little support from his fellow Democrats. As Sweeney scrambles for votes, Senate Republicans say they favor Governor Chris Christie’s proposal, which a new non-partisan report predicts would save about 16 times more money… Continue Reading

Unions Say Bill on Healthcare Contributions Would Hurt Collective Bargaining Power

Posted in Public Employment Labor Law
  As reported by nj.com, leaders of New Jersey’s public workers unions said they will launch a full court press against a bill sponsored by Senate President Stephen Sweeney that would force public employees to pay more for their health care benefits. The unions have called the bill an attempt to throw out collective bargaining… Continue Reading

Gov. Christie Goes After State Worker Benefits to Fund Tax Cuts & Credits

Posted in Public Employment Labor Law
  As reported on trentonian.com, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie held fast to his national reputation for fiscal discipline amid the widespread financial crisis that has hit the United States, unveiling a $29.4 billion state budget that calls for heftier contributions from state workers for pension and health care benefits. Christie proposes paying $500 million… Continue Reading

Senator Sweeney to Unveil Bill Requiring State Employees to Contribute More for Medical Benefits

Posted in Public Employment Labor Law
  As reported by nj.com, Senate President Stephen Sweeney will unveil a plan that aims to slash the State’s huge medical costs by requiring public employees to kick in significantly more to health benefits, according to three officials familiar with the proposal. The Sweeney plan shares much common ground with Governor Chris Christie’s reform agenda and… Continue Reading

Christie Seeks to Propose Increase in Healthcare Contributions for Public Employees

Posted in Public Employment Labor Law
  As reported by nj.com on January 13, 2011, Governor Chris Christie proposed significantly higher health insurance premiums for hundreds of thousands of public workers in New Jersey, saying overly generous benefits are threatening to bankrupt the system. Christie told a town hall audience in Bergen County that state and local workers, teachers, police, and… Continue Reading
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